Japanese children

Little girls dressed in kimono for the festival at Meiji shrine, Tokyo, Japan too too sweet

Torii gates by night, Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kyoto, Japan

伏見稲荷大社 Torii gates by night, Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kyoto, Japan

Sado (tea ceremony) is a ceremonial way of preparing and drinking tea, which usually uses matcha, a green tea powder. The custom has been strongly influenced by Zen Buddhism. The essence of the Japanese tea ceremony is reflected in its 4 main principles: harmony (with other people and with nature), respect (of others), purity (of the mind and the senses) and tranquility (peace of mind and appreciation of nature's abundance).

Matcha is the powdered green tea used for centuries in the Japanese tea ceremony. It is also used in other foods, like ice cream, smoothies, and chocolates.

Matcha Cake Sushi Rolls ... also check out the tiramisushi ones!

Matcha Cake Sushi Rolls

Sprinkle Bakes: Matcha Cake Sushi Rolls (via momagus: fuckyeahmatcha: foodforjubilee:)

Pick of the Day: Onna-Bugeisha | Anselblue Design Studio

"Winter Geisha with Umbrella and Lantern" ~ Meiji-era studio view from a rare series of ca. full-plate images printed by sunlight on simple "salted paper" and hand-tinted with transparent water colors. Attributed to Shinichi Suzuki [the Younger], circa

Pick of the Day: Onna-Bugeisha | Anselblue Design Studio

"Winter Geisha with Umbrella and Lantern" ~ Meiji-era studio view from a rare series of ca. full-plate images printed by sunlight on simple "salted paper" and hand-tinted with transparent water colors. Attributed to Shinichi Suzuki [the Younger], circa

Female Samurai Warrior - Onno-Bugeisha - Female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class - @~ Mlle

Rare photograph of an Onna-bugeisha, female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan. Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.


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