Tandy Radio Shack  TRS 80 MODEL II  	    The TRS-80 model II, is the obscure brother of the TRS-80 family. Many internet pages deal with the models 1,3 and 4 but omit the model 2... This is maybe because the TRS-80 Model 2 was intended to be a business computer for use in offices and labs. Thus it is equiped with a full height Shugart 8'' drive with a capacity of 500k which is a lot compared to the 87k offered by the TRS-80 Model 1 system disk.

Tandy Radio Shack TRS 80 MODEL II The TRS-80 model II, is the obscure brother of the TRS-80 family. Many internet pages deal with the models 1,3 and 4 but omit the model 2... This is maybe because the TRS-80 Model 2 was intended to be a business computer for use in offices and labs. Thus it is equiped with a full height Shugart 8'' drive with a capacity of 500k which is a lot compared to the 87k offered by the TRS-80 Model 1 system disk.

Sharp  MZ 80K  	    The MZ-80K was, alongside the Apple II, the Commodore PET and the Tandy TRS 80痴 one of the best known computer in the early 80's. Its name stands for "M" from MICRO and Z-80 from the computer it uses.    It has no language in ROM, and BASIC has to be loaded from tape. Sharp called this "clean design", as you could choose what you wanted to put in your computer, the MZ-80K being delivered clean...

Sharp MZ The was, alongside the Apple II, the Commodore PET and the Tandy TRS one of the best known computer in the early Its name stands for "M" from MICRO and from the computer it uses. It has no language in ROM, and

Sanyo  PHC 3000  	    Nothing is known about the history of this computer which was probably sold only in Japan.    It was one of the rare professional computer to use the 16-bit Texas Instruments TMS-9900 microprocessor, also used in the TI-99/4 home computer.    A Basic interpreter and Assembler were available on diskette.

Sanyo PHC 3000 Nothing is known about the history of this computer which…

Sord  M223 series  	    These computers were generally sold for specific professionnal use along with the appropriate software.    Two models were launched: the Sord MK II 203 and Sord MK II 223. The difference is that the 223 has 3 x S100 slots for easy expansion. Both have a special DMA channel for the disks (floppy and hard disk).    Some software was sold with them, which included the MFDOS, several Sord BASIC's, a compiled Basic (C-Basic) and many tools.

Sord M223 series These computers were generally sold for specific professionnal use along with the appropriate software. Two models were launched: the Sord MK II 203 and Sord MK II 223. The difference is that the 223 has 3 x S100 slots for easy expansion. Both have a special DMA channel for the disks (floppy and hard disk). Some software was sold with them, which included the MFDOS, several Sord BASIC's, a compiled Basic (C-Basic) and many tools.

Sharp  MZ 80C  	    The MZ-80c is based on the MZ-80K, but offers some enhancements to match the professional market of that time. The price was improved too ;-) It was the first MZ-80 computer to be delivered assembled as opposed to first MZ-80k which were sold as kits.    The RAM size is now of 48 KB. The keyboard which was so strange on the MZ-80K because of its matrix organisation, has now a more common layout with a large spacebar key. The numeric keypad is separated.

Sharp MZ 80C The MZ-80c is based on the MZ-80K, but offers some enhancements to match the professional market of that time. The price was improved too ;-) It was the first MZ-80 computer to be delivered assembled as opposed to first MZ-80k which were sold as kits. The RAM size is now of 48 KB. The keyboard which was so strange on the MZ-80K because of its matrix organisation, has now a more common layout with a large spacebar key. The numeric keypad is separated.

OPEN UNIVERSITY, UK  PT501  	    Virtually no information about this training board that was provided, prior to the Hektor PT602 with a Open University course called 'Microprocessors and Product Development - a course for managers'.    The choice of the microprocessor is a bit surprising as the 8049 was more a microcontroller than a true microprocessor. Later, the 8049 will be commonly found inside dot-matrix and PC keyboards.

Open University UK A training board that was provided, prior to the Hektor with a Open University course called 'Microprocessors and Product Development - a course for managers'.

NEC  PC 8001  	    In 1979, the NEC PC-8001 was an excellent machine, offering 8 colors when most of its competitors were still monochrome. There is even a (low) graphic resolution of 160 x 100 dots. It could display capital and small letters.    The PC-8001 had great success with Japanese businesses, where it was widely used. At the time, NEC claimed that the PC-8001 represented at least 45% of their home japanese market.

NEC PC 8001 In 1979, the NEC PC-8001 was an excellent machine, offering 8 colors when most of its competitors were still monochrome. There is even a (low) graphic resolution of 160 x 100 dots. It could display capital and small letters. The PC-8001 had great success with Japanese businesses, where it was widely used. At the time, NEC claimed that the PC-8001 represented at least 45% of their home japanese market.

South West Technical Products Corporation  S/09  	    The SWTPC S/09 system was the second computer of the brand based on the Motorola 6809 microprocessor, said to be the most powerful 8-bits general purpose MPU available.    As with the first 6809 version, it used the SS-50 version bus. The S/O9 system had a 20-bit adress bus. It was able to address up to 768 Kb. of memory and used dynamic address translation to map 4K pages into the 64K address space of the microprocessor.

The SWTPC system was the second computer of the brand based on the Motorola 6809 microprocessor, said to be the most powerful general purpose MPU available.

LUCAS   Lucas  Nascom 2  	    The Nascom 2 was a deep evolution of the Nascom 1 that required 18 months of design and development but offered lots of enhancements: a faster processor (4 MHZ.), greater RAM and ROM capacity (10 KB + 10 KB), built-in Microsoft BASIC, extended keyboard, improved tape interface, etc.    User RAM could be expanded to 32 KB on board and the system didn't need the use of expansion board or system bus to run large applications.

LUCAS Lucas Nascom 2 The Nascom 2 was a deep evolution of the Nascom 1 that required 18 months of design and development but offered lots of enhancements: a faster processor (4 MHZ.), greater RAM and ROM capacity (10 KB + 10 KB), built-in Microsoft BASIC, extended keyboard, improved tape interface, etc. User RAM could be expanded to 32 KB on board and the system didn't need the use of expansion board or system bus to run large applications.

Intersystems  DPS-1  	    InterSystems was the computers brand name of the Ithaca company which previously manufactured various cards for other mainframe makers.    The DPS-1 is based on the S-100 bus. It seems to be a copy of the Altair 8800 and Cromemco Z-1 systems. The case had a 20-card capacity and can support 8 and 16 bit processors.

Intersystems DPS-1 InterSystems was the computers brand name of the Ithaca company which previously manufactured various cards for other mainframe makers. The DPS-1 is based on the S-100 bus. It seems to be a copy of the Altair 8800 and Cromemco Z-1 systems. The case had a 20-card capacity and can support 8 and 16 bit processors.

Seattle Computer  Gazelle  	    Even if you've never heard of this massive computer, the Gazelle is truly a historic computer. Neither because it was one of the first 8088, then 8086 based computer, nor because this Gazelle is propably the heaviest 8088 system ever built, but because it was the computer Tim Paterson wrote DOS for, the first DOS operating system that became later MS-DOS 1.0 when Microsoft bought the rights to DOS from Tim's company, afterwards.

Seattle Computer Gazelle Even if you've never heard of this massive computer, the Gazelle is truly a historic computer. Neither because it was one of the first 8088, then 8086 based computer, nor because this Gazelle is propably the heaviest 8088 system ever built, but because it was the computer Tim Paterson wrote DOS for, the first DOS operating system that became later MS-DOS 1.0 when Microsoft bought the rights to DOS from Tim's company, afterwards.

Leanord  Silex  	    Little is known about this computer. Help welcomed ! Silex means flint in french, a stone mainly used in prehistoric times as tools and weapons.    The SILEX is a professional computer released in 1979 by the french company Leanord. It was conceived from a modified Apple II board.    It has a professional keyboard with function keypad and numeric keypad. The display is built-in the system.

The SILEX is a professional computer released in 1979 by the french company Leanord. It was conceived from a modified Apple II board.

Interact  Home Computer System  	    The Interact computer had a very short life in USA. It had only just got in production when the Interact Co. of Ann Arbor MI, went bankrupt. Several thousand machines were produced though. Some of them were sold by Protecto Enterprizes of Barrington, IL, the liquidator, but the main part was sold by MicroVideo, also of Ann Arbor. Protecto bought lots of back-of-the-magazine ads for years, always printed with "WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS".

The Interact computer had a very short life in USA. It had only just got in production when the Interact Co. of Ann Arbor MI, went bankrupt. Several thousand machines were produced though.

OHIO Scientific  Challenger 1P  	    Ohio Scientific, based in Ohio, USA, were the makers of the Superboard II. The Challenger 1P and Challenger IIP-MF were essentially cased versions of this single board system with integrated keyboard, a single 5Volt power supply and the first 6502 version of Microsoft BASIC interpreter.    An optional floppy disk controller and a extra 24K of ram for this unit was available using a 610 expansion board.

OHIO Scientific Challenger 1P Ohio Scientific, based in Ohio, USA, were the makers of the Superboard II. The Challenger 1P and Challenger IIP-MF were essentially cased versions of this single board system with integrated keyboard, a single 5Volt power supply and the first 6502 version of Microsoft BASIC interpreter. An optional floppy disk controller and a extra 24K of ram for this unit was available using a 610 expansion board.

TANGERINE  MICROTAN 65  	    This computer is what is the ZX-80 to the ZX-Spectrum, but for the Oric 1. Tangerine developped this computer before they became Oric and produced the Oric-1.  It was mainly sold in kit, without the complete keyboard shown in the photo, but with a little hexadecimal keyboard.    The unextended Microtan 65 couldn't use Basic (Basic65) due to its RAM limitation (1kb), so only machine-code was usable.

TANGERINE MICROTAN 65 This computer is what is the ZX-80 to the ZX-Spectrum, but for the Oric 1. Tangerine developped this computer before they became Oric and produced the Oric-1. It was mainly sold in kit, without the complete keyboard shown in the photo, but with a little hexadecimal keyboard. The unextended Microtan 65 couldn't use Basic (Basic65) due to its RAM limitation (1kb), so only machine-code was usable.

SOLID STATE TECHNOLOGY  Athena  	    Little is known about this obscure professional computer.    The Athena used a true multi-tasking OS that enabled single keystroke application switching. It also incorporated intelligent distributed multiprocessing into perpherial interfaces.    The machine and OS were developed by an MIT graduate and conceived by Solid State Technology from Boston. The Athena is based on a 8085 Intel chipset.

The Solid State Technology Athena used a true multi-tasking OS that enabled single keystroke application switching. It also incorporated intelligent distributed multiprocessing into perpherial interfaces.

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