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Sakamoto Ryoma as Sakamoto Tatsuma

Ōtake Risuke Minamoto no Takeyuki | TENSHIN SHODEN KATORI SHINTO-RYU style Kenjutsu,  Shihan, master teacher

Ōtake Risuke Minamoto no Takeyuki, current head of the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto ryu style of Kenjutsu.

江戸城 古写真 - Google 検索

Quite the same Wikipedia.

A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.    Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.

Rare photograph of an Onna-bugeisha, female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan. Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.

c0072801_5252886.jpg (388×620)

c0072801_5252886.jpg (388×620)

This is a picture of a 1880 Japanese man. They wore these coat like Komono's during winter time. However, they were not padded so they layered clothing to keep themselves warm.

This is a picture of a 1880 Japanese man. They wore these coat like Komono's during winter time. However, they were not padded so they layered clothing to keep themselves warm.

O Sensei and katana   Morehei Uesheba... founder of Aikido; permanent installation in my mind.

O' Sensei and katana Morihei Ueshiba. founder of Aikido.

Fukuzawa Yukichi (福澤 諭吉, January 10, 1835 – February 3, 1901) was a Japanese author, Enlightenment writer, teacher, translator, entrepreneur and journalist who founded Keio-Gijuku University, the newspaper Jiji-Shinpo and the Institute for Study of Infectious Diseases. His ideas about government and social institutions made a lasting impression on a rapidly changing Japan during the Meiji Era. He is regarded as one of the founders of modern Japan. He is called a Japanese Voltaire.

FUKUZAWA Yukichi 福沢諭吉, Japanese author, teacher, translator, entrepreneur and journalist.

The last shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu (1837-1913) shogun from 1866 to 1867, the 15th and last shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan. He was part of a movement which aimed to reform the aging shogunate, but was ultimately unsuccessful. After resigning in late 1867, he went into retirement, and largely avoided the public eye for the rest of his life.

The last shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu (1837-1913) shogun from 1866 to 1867, the 15th and last shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan. He was part of a movement which aimed to reform the aging shogunate, but was ultimately unsuccessful. After resigning in late 1867, he went into retirement, and largely avoided the public eye for the rest of his life.

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