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Mabel Loomis Todd, 1856 - 1932  Mistress to Austin Dickinson.  Editor who helped Thomas Wentworth Higginson publish the first three volumes of Emily's works.

Mabel Loomis Todd, 1856 - 1932 Mistress to Austin Dickinson. Editor who helped Thomas Wentworth Higginson publish the first three volumes of Emily's works.

THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON, co-editor of the first two collections of Emily Dickinson’s poems, was a man of astonishingly varied talents and accomplishments. A lifelong radical, he was an outspoken abolitionist, advocate of women’s rights, and founder of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society. During the Civil War, he served as commander of the first Union regiment of freed African American soldiers.

THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON, co-editor of the first two collections of Emily Dickinson’s poems, was a man of astonishingly varied talents and accomplishments. A lifelong radical, he was an outspoken abolitionist, advocate of women’s rights, and founder of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society. During the Civil War, he served as commander of the first Union regiment of freed African American soldiers.

Lavinia Dickinson: "When Emily died in May 1886, Vinnie burned her sister's correspondence, as requested, but to her amazement discovered hundreds of poems about which Emily had given no instructions...Without what Emily called Vinnie’s 'inciting voice' (L827), we would know little or nothing of Dickinson’s great lyric poetry."

Lavinia Dickinson: "When Emily died in May 1886, Vinnie burned her sister's correspondence, as requested, but to her amazement discovered hundreds of poems about which Emily had given no instructions...Without what Emily called Vinnie’s 'inciting voice' (L827), we would know little or nothing of Dickinson’s great lyric poetry."

Mary Lyon, the founder of Mount Holyoke Female Seminary.  She declared Emily Dickinson a "lost soul."

Mary Lyon, the founder of Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. She declared Emily Dickinson a "lost soul."

Lavinia Dickinson

Lavinia Dickinson

Daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, December 1846.    Source:  Todd-Bingham Picture Collection and Family Papers, Yale University Manuscripts & Archives Digital Images Database

Daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, December 1846. Source: Todd-Bingham Picture Collection and Family Papers, Yale University Manuscripts & Archives Digital Images Database

emily dickinson

emily dickinson

Emily Dickinson And Her Family | Image: Houghton Library, Harvard University

Emily Dickinson And Her Family | Image: Houghton Library, Harvard University

Sir Grump-a-Lot, otherwise known as Edward Dickinson, or, simply, "father."

Sir Grump-a-Lot, otherwise known as Edward Dickinson, or, simply, "father."

Susan Dickenson was Emily's sister in law (she had married Emily's brother Austin).  Susan's friendship helped expand the poet's horizons, and their sharing of books and ideas was a vital component of her intellectual life. In her later days, Emily Dickinson wrote to Susan, "With the exception of Shakespeare, you have told me of more knowledge than any one living. To say that sincerely is strange praise"

Susan Dickenson was Emily's sister in law (she had married Emily's brother Austin). Susan's friendship helped expand the poet's horizons, and their sharing of books and ideas was a vital component of her intellectual life. In her later days, Emily Dickinson wrote to Susan, "With the exception of Shakespeare, you have told me of more knowledge than any one living. To say that sincerely is strange praise"

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