Explore Water Witch, Celtic Mythology, and more!

Also known as: Necors, Nykers, Water Wolves, Fuath, Fifel, Afanc, Nekkers, Nikkisen, River-Men, Water Trolls, Orc-Thyrs. There seem to be several different breeds of Water Ogre, some of which are entirely habitual to water and others who are amphibious and may also trek the land in search of victims. Nicky, Nicky Nye of the River Usk in Gwent, Wales (and possibly also encountered in Somerset, England) has also been rumoured to either snatch victims from small boats or to cause strong…

Also known as: Necors, Nykers, Water Wolves, Fuath, Fifel, Afanc, Nekkers, Nikkisen, River-Men, Water Trolls, Orc-Thyrs. There seem to be several different breeds of Water Ogre, some of which are entirely habitual to water and others who are amphibious and may also trek the land in search of victims. Nicky, Nicky Nye of the River Usk in Gwent, Wales (and possibly also encountered in Somerset, England) has also been rumoured to either snatch victims from small boats or to cause strong…

helena nelson reed art | ... .files.wordpress.com/2008/10/nelson-reed_helena-euronome.jpg

Eurynome, by Helena Nelson Reed - She was the Titan goddess of water-meadows and…

Leshy by Ink-Yami.deviantart.com on @DeviantArt

inkyami: “ Leshy (“Forest man”) — a woodland spirit, the master of forests in east-slavic (and most-commonly russian) mythology, protector of local flora and fauna.

Basilisk (Greek Mythology)

Can You Name The Mythical Creature From The Description?

Shellycoat- Scottish folklore: a type of bogeyman that haunts rivers and streams. They wear a coat made of shells that rattle upon movement. They are relatively harmless but will mislead travelers who wander onto their territory.

Random Creature Feature: A “Shellycoat” is a creature from Scottish mythology that is named for its coat of shells. This sneaky fae haunts rivers and streams, and enjoys pulling pranks on.

Slav Mythology (a small part of it)

Slav Mythology (a small part of it)

Slav Mythology (a small part of it) - Tap the link to shop on our official online store! You can also join our affiliate and/or rewards programs for FREE!

Celtic sea God Manannan

Manannan mac Lir, God of sailors, merchants, and the Isle of Man.

A brownie/brounie or urisk (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north, though more commonly hobs have this role). It is the Scottish and Northern English counterpart of the Scandinavian tomte, the Slavic domovoi and the German Heinzelmännchen.

A brownie/brounie or urisk (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England.

Tomah Joseph (1837-1914), a Passamaquoddy Indian living at Peter Dana Point, etched the "Mikamwes" illustration on birchbark. It is the frontispiece of the book Algonquin Legends of New England or Myths and Folk Lore of the Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot Tribes by Charles G. Leland (1884). Joseph also provided much information about the legends for Leland. Item # 28652 on Maine Memory Network

Images from a beautifully illustrated book from 1884 of the myths and legends of the Algonquin peoples of New England, including the stories of Glooskap, Lox, the Rabbit Magician and more.

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