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BRONZE STATUE OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AS THE CONQUERING SUN GOD OF THE PANDORIANS CIRCA 100A.D

BRONZE STATUE OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AS THE CONQUERING SUN GOD OF THE PANDORIANS CIRCA 100A.D

Bronze depiction of Sucellus - Roman - 1st-2nd Century AD. Sucellus was a major Gaulish deity associated with the underworld. The Walters Art Museum

Bronze depiction of Sucellus - Roman - Century AD. Sucellus was a major Gaulish deity associated with the underworld. The Walters Art Museum

Roman,100 AD  "The Egyptian goddess Isis was adopted into Roman religion in the first century A.D. Isis was an ancient goddess with a wide range of powers, including the ability to offer her followers a better afterlife. In Roman religion, Isis was often merged with other Roman goddesses, creating new composite deities. This statuette portrays Isis combined with Fortuna, a fertility goddess who controlled the fate of both individuals and cities.

Isis-Fortuna Roman, AD The J. Paul Getty Museum “The Egyptian goddess Isis was adopted into Roman religion in the first century A. Isis was an ancient goddess with a wide range of powers,.

2nd – 3rd C. CE Cautopates, (with Cautès) were the two companions of Mithra, whose  secret cult was extremely popular among the Roman Legions throughout the empire from the 2nd C.-4th C. This limestone statue in the Temple of Bordeaux presents Cautopatès dressed in quasi-persian fashion like Mithra  with a Phrygian cap and cape painted in red. Musee D'Aquitaine

Митра Бог, Cautopates, Musee daquitaine – c AD.: Cautopatès and Cautès were the two companions of Mithra, t

A Roman bronze statuette of Ceres from the Miho Museum, Kyoto, Japan (1st c. AD),

A Roman bronze statuette of Ceres (goddess of agriculture) from the Miho Museum, Kyoto, Japan c.

Statue of Mithras, ancient Persian god of light who was adopted into the Roman pantheon. Mithras is shown wearing the Phrygian cap. Louvre.

Statue of Mithras, ancient Persian god of light who was adopted into the Roman pantheon. Mithras is shown wearing the Phrygian cap.

Mithras, Persian god of Light. Portion of one of three altars found in a 3rd-4th century AD stone temple near a Roman fort along Hadrian's Wall at Carrawburgh, England. The front is a relief of Mithras rising from Living Rock, holding the Sun God's whip in his right hand, wearing a cloak and a radiate crown. The inscription reads 'To the Invincible God Mithras, Marcus Simplicius Simplex, prefect, willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow.'

Mithras, Persian god of Light. Portion of one of three altars found in a 3rd-4th century AD stone temple near a Roman fort along Hadrian's Wall at Carrawburgh, England. The front is a relief of Mithras rising from Living Rock, holding the Sun God's whip in his right hand, wearing a cloak and a radiate crown. The inscription reads 'To the Invincible God Mithras, Marcus Simplicius Simplex, prefect, willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow.'

Given birth on 25 December by a virgin, he was adored by shepherds. Accompanied by 12 disciples, he would feed them bread and wine. He sacrificed this solar bull for our salvation. His votary would bathe in that bull's blood. He sacrificed himself thereby, then resurrected on the third day. This event was celebrated around Easter. He was often represented as Good Shepherd. Throughout the Roman Empire the congregation of Mithra's cult reunited on Sundays.

Given birth on 25 December by a virgin, he was adored by shepherds.

Gallo-Roman Tutela, silver statuette Draped Goddess of the City (see mural crown) holding a twinned cornucopia and a patera; the Dioscouri are on her wings, at the tips of which is an arc holding busts of the gods recognizable by their attributes. A tiny garlanded altar is at her feet. From the Macon hoard. Roman 150-220 CE. London: British Museum.

Draped Goddess of the City holding a twinned cornucopia and a patera; the Dioscouri are on her wings, at the tips of which is an arc holding busts of the gods Roman CE.

For the Romans, the cult of Sol Invictus or 'Undefeated Sun' was supreme. Roman Emperor Constantine adhered to it so much that even when he embraced Christianity, he changed the day of Sabbath from Friday to SUN-day!!

For the Romans, the cult of Sol Invictus or 'Undefeated Sun' was supreme. Roman Emperor Constantine adhered to it so much that even when he embraced Christianity, he changed the day of Sabbath from Friday to SUN-day!

AN EGYPTIAN BRONZE BA-BIRD   Roman Period, Circa 2nd Century A.D.   The falcon body with a human head and face, the lappets of a nemes-headdress falling on to the chest revealing incised strands of long curly hair, wearing a composite crown framed by cow's horns  4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) high

AN EGYPTIAN BRONZE BA-BIRD Roman Period, Circa 2nd Century A.D. The falcon body with a human head and face, the lappets of a nemes-headdress falling on to the chest revealing incised strands of long curly hair, wearing a composite crown framed by cow's horns 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) high

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