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The silhouettes Soldiers of the 8th East Yorkshire Regiment moving up to the front at the Battle of Broodseinde, WWI. Photo by Ernest Brooks

The silhouettes Soldiers of the 8th East Yorkshire Regiment moving up to the front at the Battle of Broodseinde, WWI. Photo by Ernest Brooks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izyDOGpBc40WWI tribute video featuring HD photos and combat footage of the great war.

A working party of the Manchester Regiment moving up to the trenches near Serre in France, January 1917

WWI, 22 August 1917; Scots Guards moving up to the trenches near Boezinge. Battle of Passchendaele. ©IWM Q 2755

WWI, 22 August Scots Guards moving up to the trenches near Boezinge. Battle of Passchendaele. ©IWM Q 2755

Australians of the Imperial Camel Corps on the sandhills.

Australian Diggers of the Imperial Camel Corps WWI Middle East theatre.

Removing the dead from the trenches [World War I]

The Legend of What Actually Lived in the “No Man’s Land” Between World War I’s Trenches

British soldiers 1917 - Men of the East Yorkshire regiment, silhouetted, make their way around shell craters at Frezenberg, during the Third Battle of Ypres 01-Sep-1917 EMEP0269133

British soldiers 1917 - Men of the East Yorkshire regiment, silhouetted, make their way around shell craters at Frezenberg, during the Third Battle of Ypres ©Mary Evans/Robert Hunt Collection / The Image Works

Sep 6 1917 Road to Veldhoek, near Ypres. A camouflaged screen borders the road

WWI covered live on

WWI, 6 Sept Ammunition-carrying horses passing along the road to Veldhoek, near Ypres, camouflaged screen borders the road. © IWM (Q

Until Then, c. WW1 (via)

WWI German Soldier and Sweetheart "Cheer up, people, the soldiers are here. We change lovers and places until the grim reaper calls us to the headquarters.

War horses, WWI

War horses, WWI, real ones!

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre of picture) who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation. He did this for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the "Anzac legend".

John Simpson Kirkpatrick (centre), ANZAC War Hero - Born in South Shields

After years stranded in Antarctica, Frank Hurley returned to find civilization tearing itself apart.

One photographer's heartbreaking first-person account of WWI's Western Front

"The World's most infamous highway, the Menin road on a winter's sunset" - Exhibition of war photographs / taken by Capt.

Horses in the Great War are as much a symbol of that conflict as the mud of Passchedaele or the gas mask. Veterans I interviewed in the 1980s had harrowing, often terribly sad memories of animals they had cared for at the front, and in my Great War photo archive I have literally hundreds of images showing a beloved horse, special to a particular soldier who brought them home.

The children’s author Michael Morpurgo published War Horse in 1982 long before the growth of interest in the Great War began. He has said many times that little did he realise it would morph …

WWI, 18 Nov 1914; Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) outside a machine gun hut, Houplines Sector. © IWM (Q 51532)

WWI, 18 Nov Soldiers of the Battalion, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) outside a machine gun hut, Houplines Sector. © IWM (Q

El Dorado by Ben Rabinovitch

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