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Hatshepsut [Egyptian; From Deir el-Bahri, western Thebes] (29.3.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hatshepsut [Egyptian; From Deir el-Bahri, western Thebes] (29.3.2) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

お説教の中に、いつもエジプト神話のくだりがある

お説教の中に、いつもエジプト神話のくだりがある

Amenhotep II (sometimes read as Amenophis II and meaning Amun is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Description from shelf3d.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Amenhotep II (sometimes read as Amenophis II and meaning Amun is Satisfied) was the seventh Pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Description from shelf3d.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Sphinx probably a table support Roman 120-140 CE from Monte Cagnolo outside Lanuvium near Rome, Italy by mharrsch on Flickr. Via Flickr: Piece exhibited as part of “The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece” assembled by The British Museum and Photographed at the Portland Art Museum in Portland, Oregon.

Sphinx probably a table support Roman 120-140 CE from Monte Cagnolo outside Lanuvium near Rome, Italy by mharrsch on Flickr. Via Flickr: Piece exhibited as part of “The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece” assembled by The British Museum and Photographed at the Portland Art Museum in Portland, Oregon.

gold egypt 表4人+中4人の計8神体制でファラオのモツを護送中

gold egypt 表4人+中4人の計8神体制でファラオのモツを護送中

Dynasty 18, joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III  – (ca. 1473-1458 B.C.)  From Thebes, originally from Hatshepsut’s temple at Deir el-Bahri.   According to the inscription on the base, “Maatkare” (Hatshepsut) is represented here as “the one who gives Maat to Amun”. Maat was the goddess of order, balance and justice. When a pharaoh offered an image of Maat to another deity, it was a reaffirmation that honor was the guiding principle of his/her rule. The Met, New York

Dynasty 18, joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III – (ca. 1473-1458 B.C.) From Thebes, originally from Hatshepsut’s temple at Deir el-Bahri. According to the inscription on the base, “Maatkare” (Hatshepsut) is represented here as “the one who gives Maat to Amun”. Maat was the goddess of order, balance and justice. When a pharaoh offered an image of Maat to another deity, it was a reaffirmation that honor was the guiding principle of his/her rule. The Met, New York

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