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Lucy Nola George (1897-1978) one of first Cherokee weavers to make baskets from Honeysuckle. From article: Honeysuckle vines are flexible. To make a sturdy basket, the vines are woven over a more rigid framework of white oak. Basket weavers who use honeysuckle must be proficient in gathering both the vines and white oak trees. Lucy George preferred hickory for handles and gathered traditional woods plants as well. She used bloodroot, yellow root, and walnut bark to dye her weaving materials.

Lucy Nola George (1897-1978) one of first Cherokee weavers to make baskets from Honeysuckle. From article: Honeysuckle vines are flexible. To make a sturdy basket, the vines are woven over a more rigid framework of white oak. Basket weavers who use honeysuckle must be proficient in gathering both the vines and white oak trees. Lucy George preferred hickory for handles and gathered traditional woods plants as well. She used bloodroot, yellow root, and walnut bark to dye her weaving materials.

In the Appalachians, both before and during the Craft Revival, baskets were made from a variety of materials.  By far the most common material for non-Cherokee baskets was white oak.  These baskets were made from a young oak sapling that was split laterally again and again to form long, supple splits or splints.  Woven over a framework of ribs, split oak baskets were sturdy.

In the Appalachians, both before and during the Craft Revival, baskets were made from a variety of materials. By far the most common material for non-Cherokee baskets was white oak. These baskets were made from a young oak sapling that was split laterally again and again to form long, supple splits or splints. Woven over a framework of ribs, split oak baskets were sturdy.

The Cherokee Indians on their reservation at Cherokee, Swain County, North Carolina, make a wide variety of baskets, using split oak, honeysuckle, but especially split [river] cane, a strong, durable native plant of the bamboo family.  The [river] cane is a very difficult fiber to work as it is hard and tough and must be kept wet, but the Cherokees have employed it as far back as memory goes.  The shapes made include carrying baskets, arrow quivers, and other forms of value in their own…

The Cherokee Indians on their reservation at Cherokee, Swain County, North Carolina, make a wide variety of baskets, using split oak, honeysuckle, but especially split [river] cane, a strong, durable native plant of the bamboo family. The [river] cane is a very difficult fiber to work as it is hard and tough and must be kept wet, but the Cherokees have employed it as far back as memory goes. The shapes made include carrying baskets, arrow quivers, and other forms of value in their own…

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