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Declaration of Arbroath Plaque.  This document basically declared that the rule of Scotland was not determined by the pope, or even by God, but by the people of Scotland. It stated that Scotland had always been free (longer than England, in fact), and that any so-called king that threatened to deprive men of their natural rights did not deserve a throne. Robert the Bruce had set them free and was their choice, and Bernard begged the pope to recognize him which he did.

Declaration of Arbroath Plaque. This document basically declared that the rule…

Schottische Mythen und Legenden

Scottish Myths and Legends – Creatures of Scotland, including the fairy and loch ness monster, as well as more obscure tales

'YES to an Independent Scotland' ~ Tee Hee Hee :-) via Facebook!

I Am Scottish We Don't Keep Calm: lol.funny cause it's true.

Grave of King Robert "the Bruce" of Scotland

Robert III, King of Scotland. Robert III August 1337 – April born John Stewart, was King of Scots from 1390 to his death.

Robert the Bruce's heart casket, Melrose Abbey, Borders, Scotland

Robert the Bruce's heart casket, Melrose Abbey, Borders, Scotland photo©jadoretotravel

The Scottish Crown Jewels.. are so magnificent when seen in person!

CROWN~Scottish Crown Jewels - Scottish Crown Jewels, dating from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, are the oldest set of crown jewels in the British Isles These are on display at Edinburgh Castle.

Scottish Luckenbooth Emblem: Two hearts entwined and crowned is worn as a symbol of love and troth in Scotland (read more here: http://www.historicimpressions.com/Scottish.htm):

Scottish Luckenbooth Emblem-Two hearts entwined and crowned is worn as a symbol of love and troth in Scotland. -- hearts entwined like here, with a C in the center and a crown.

Gondoline

The Scottish Lion is the ancient heraldic emblem of the King of Scots and therefore it should technically only be used by royalty. It was supposedly first used in the century by King William the Lion ,King of the Scots from 1165 to 1214 .

The Scottish quaich (pronounced quake) is a shallow cup that has been used for centuries to offer guests a welcoming toast. The cup represented the host’s generosity, and the two-handled design symbolized the guest’s trustworthiness, as it left him unable to reach for a weapon. Today quaichs are often found at Scottish weddings and other milestone occasions.

The Scottish quaich (pronounced quake) is a shallow cup that has been used for centuries to offer guests a welcoming toast.