Explore Shell Jewelry, Jewellery, and more!

Oceanic Art - Papua New Guinea Art - Adornments and Utensils from Sepik River Region of Papua New Guinea.

Oceanic Art - Papua New Guinea Art - Conus Shell Adornments from Sepik River Region of Papua New Guinea.

Conus shell currency from the Solomon Islands  ( detail of money belt  ) on original macrame belt. The largest diameter disc is 2.5" . Most are between 100 to 200 years old,beautifully worn.

BEAUTIFUL Conus shell currency from the Solomon Islands ( detail of money belt ) on original macrame belt. The largest diameter disc is . Most are between 100 to 200 years old,beautifully worn.

Africa | Ornamental strap from the Ovambo people of Namibia | Leather strap, dyed in red and embroidered with seven shell discs, attached with a central metal pin

Africa - wealth strap from the Ovambo peoples of southern Angola and northern Namibia - leather strap with seven conus shell front discs, each attached with a central dome-headed metal pin.

Papua New Guinea | Kina necklace from the Sepik people | Kinas are a sign of wealth and prosperity. They can be used for bride price, blood feud paybacks and exchange festivals as well as for admissions to men’s clubs and secret societies.   They were worn by men and women either alone or in multiples for special celebrations when warriors would wear a kina shell pectoral as the focal point of their dress. | 495$

Kinas are rare treasures from Papua New Guinea and a sign of wealth and prosperity. They can be used for bride price, blood feud paybacks and exchange festivals as well as for admis…

Shell Papua New Guinea Shell Tridacna Money Stick Handmade Natural Shells Brides Gift Currency Trading Stick Money Status One of a Kind

Reserved Shell Papua New Guinea Shell Tridacna Money Stick Handmade Natural Shells Brides Gift Currency Trading Stick Money Status

Africa | "ekipa" ornaments from the Ovambo people Namibia | Ivory, bone, shell (perhaps porcelain modelled to resemble a shell) | 1,995$ ~ sold (05/00)

Africa - Namibia - Ekipa or Omakipa buttons from the Ovambo people - bridal ornaments - of ivory or horn. ( bottom left probably an old porcelain replica made many years ago by the Portuguese modelled to resemble a conus shell)

Pinterest
Search