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Communal Latrine With up to 800 men living in the fort, good hygiene was essential to keep the healthy. Located in the southeast corner of the fort, this latrine ("latrina") reveals the clean, communal attitude to hygiene in the Roman world. The latrine has a deep sewer, originally covered with a wooden floor and benches with holes to form multiple toilet seats. The sewer was flushed by rainwater brought from all over the fort in drains, and out via a culvert under the fort wall.

Communal Latrine With up to 800 men living in the fort, good hygiene was…

People would socialize at communal toilets. Rome had over 140 public toilets. | 15 Truly Bizarre Facts About Ancient Rome

People would socialize at communal toilets. Rome had over 140 public toilets.

*ROME, ITALY ~ People would socialize at communal toilets. Rome had over 140 public toilets.

Daily life around a Roman insula. Roman apartment buildings contained vendors on the first floor and living quarters on the floors above. The apartments in the insulae lacked most basic amenities, such as kitchens and bathrooms. As a result, Romans lived a highly communal lifestyle. The lower classes used public baths and toilets, ate in restaurants, and spent leisure time in common spaces, like the forum.

Daily life around a Roman insula. Roman apartment buildings contained vendors…

Communal Latrine  With up to 800 men living in the fort, good hygiene was essential to keep the healthy. Located in the southeast corner of the fort, this latrine ("latrina") reveals the clean, communal attitude to hygiene in the Roman world. The latrine has a deep sewer, originally covered with a wooden floor and benches with holes to form multiple toilet seats. The sewer was flushed by rainwater brought from all over the fort in drains, and out via a culvert under the fort wall.

Communal Latrine With up to 800 men living in the fort, good hygiene was essential to keep the healthy. Located in the southeast corner of the fort, this latrine ("latrina") reveals the clean, communal attitude to hygiene in the Roman world. The latrine has a deep sewer, originally covered with a wooden floor and benches with holes to form multiple toilet seats. The sewer was flushed by rainwater brought from all over the fort in drains, and out via a culvert under the fort wall.

The Romans: 753 BC – 410 AD - Toilet paper did not exist. Instead, they used a sponge attached to a wooden handle. This stick was dipped into a water channel, or bucket, and then used. The stick was shared by everyone who used the toileting facilities. It is said that some rich Romans, not wanting to use the stick and sponge, used an ostrich feather instead. It is thought that the saying, “getting the wrong end of the stick”, came from this time period.

The Romans: 753 BC – 410 AD - Toilet paper did not exist. Instead, they used a sponge attached to a wooden handle. This stick was dipped into a water channel, or bucket, and then used. The stick was shared by everyone who used the toileting facilities. It is said that some rich Romans, not wanting to use the stick and sponge, used an ostrich feather instead. It is thought that the saying, “getting the wrong end of the stick”, came from this time period.

A massive, well-preserved 1,700 year-old Roman mosaic was recently unearthed while performing city sewer construction.

1,700-Year-Old Roman Mosaic Discovered During City Sewer Construction Project

Lod, Israel: A massive, well-preserved year-old Roman mosaic, just part of a Roman villa, was recently unearthed while performing city sewer construction.

The Etruscans laid the first underground sewers in the city of Rome around 500 BCE. And the Romans were happy to utilize them when they took over the city. Such structures then became the norm in many cities throughout the Roman world.

I've spent an awful lot of time in Roman sewers – enough to earn me the nickname "Queen of Latrines" from my friends. The Etruscans laid the first underground sewers in the city of Rome around 500 BC.

Latrine at Ephesus, (Turkey). They were part of the Scholastica Baths and built in the 1C AD. They were the public toilets of the city. Ther...

How the Romans did their business: images of Latrines throughout the Roman world

Latrine at Ephesus, (Turkey). They were part of the Scholastica Baths and built in the AD. They were the public toilets of the city. There was an entrance fee to use them. © Carole Raddato They obviously weren't built for American butts.

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