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Explore River Stones, Food Tech, and more!

River stones you can eat? Only at 2-Michelin star restaurant Mugaritz by Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz. Get the recipe and learn the thorough development process of this recipe by the Mugaritz R+D team.

Edible River Stones

River stones you can eat? Only at star restaurant Mugaritz by Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz. Get the recipe and learn the thorough development process of this recipe by the Mugaritz R+D team.

Too many steps and rules for eating but a fun April Fools recipe, Edible Stones Recipe at Epicurious.com

Edible Stones

Edible Stones (potatoes covered in edible clay) from Mugaritz Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz

Pear ice-cream  #new #nordic #cuisine - - Loved by @Andy Yang Yang Yang Yang Yang Denmark House

Pear ice cream with black tea. By Nordic Star Chef Ronny Emborg. See more of his dishes at bon-vivant.

Edible charcoal, edible coals, Mugaritz Andoni Luis Aduriz -725

Charcoal, Ashes and a 64º Egg

Simple and creative, the edible charcoal made from cassava was inspired by star Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz of Mugaritz in Spain.

Salt Cured Eggs melt in your mouth like liquid carbonara!

Salt Cured Eggs

This is perfect for those times of year when your girls lay more eggs than you can use. Golden curls of grated, Salt Cured Eggs melts in your mouth like liquid carbonara!

Mozzarella balloon recipe with olive oil powder / molecular gastronomy

Mozzarella Balloons Recipe

The mozzarella balloons will definitely surprise your diners when they finally decide to puncture the mozzarella balloon and they get a puff of roasted garlic air.

What is Molecular Gastronomy? | Molecular Recipes

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Molecular gastronomy is the science of cooking but it is commonly used to describe a new style of cuisine in which chefs explore new culinary possibilities in the kitchen.

"Rhubarb Binchotan". A molecular gastronomy dessert that mimics Japanese white charcoal made from the ubame oak, made by dipping a freeze-dried rhubarb baton into black-tinted white chocolate, and dusted with cardamom ash. The dish was created by molecular gastronomy chef Jose Andres at his restaurant minibar in Washington DC. Photo by Greg Powers.

A molecular gastronomy dessert that mimics Japanese white charcoal made from the ubame oak, made by dipping a freeze-dried rhubarb baton into black-tinted white chocolate, and dusted with cardamom ash.

Molecular Gastronomy is the practice of combining experimental chemistry with the culinary arts to alter the properties of liquid and solid food. This information graphic contains explanations and applications of various methods of preparing food by unus…

Molecular Gastronomy is the practice of combining experimental chemistry with the culinary arts to alter the properties of liquid and solid food. This information graphic contains explanations and applications of various methods of preparing food by unus&

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