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rypilian culture godess figurine, ca 4,500 BC, excavated at Bernove-Luka, Chernivtsi oblast.

rypilian culture godess figurine, ca 4,500 BC, excavated at Bernove-Luka, Chernivtsi oblast.

Cucuteni culture,  4800 to 3000 BCE from the Carpathian Mountains to the Dniester and Dnieper regions in modern-day Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine.

Cucuteni culture, 4800 to 3000 BCE from the Carpathian Mountains to the Dniester and Dnieper regions in modern-day Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine.

Hallstatt Culture sculpture 6th century BCE. Human figure on wheel, with lifted arms. Bronze support of a mobile bed, from the tomb of a prince at Hochdorf, Germany

Hallstatt Culture sculpture 6th century BCE. Human figure on wheel, with lifted arms. Bronze support of a mobile bed, from the tomb of a prince at Hochdorf, Germany

1. Woman from Willendorf  3. Prehistoric 24,000 BCE  4. Carved from limestone colored with red ocher.   5. Found in Austria.   6. Now resides in Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria   7. Example of attributes.  9. This is known as the most famous Paleolithic female figurine. The exaggerated attributes symbolizes high fertility which was a common subject for prehistoric sculptors.

1. Woman from Willendorf 3. Prehistoric 24,000 BCE 4. Carved from limestone colored with red ocher. 5. Found in Austria. 6. Now resides in Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria 7. Example of attributes. 9. This is known as the most famous Paleolithic female figurine. The exaggerated attributes symbolizes high fertility which was a common subject for prehistoric sculptors.

The Vinca Culture (Old Europe). The Vinča culture, also known as Turdaș culture or Turdaș-Vinča culture, is a Neolithic archaeological culture in Southeastern Europe, dated to the period 5700–4500 BCE.[1][2] Named for its type site, Vinča-Belo Brdo, a large tell settlement discovered by Serbian archaeologist Miloje Vasić in 1908, it represents the material remains of a prehistoric society mainly distinguished by its settlement pattern and ritual behaviour.

The Vinca Culture (Old Europe). The Vinča culture, also known as Turdaș culture or Turdaș-Vinča culture, is a Neolithic archaeological culture in Southeastern Europe, dated to the period 5700–4500 BCE.[1][2] Named for its type site, Vinča-Belo Brdo, a large tell settlement discovered by Serbian archaeologist Miloje Vasić in 1908, it represents the material remains of a prehistoric society mainly distinguished by its settlement pattern and ritual behaviour.

This is even more beautiful in person. If you are in the Cleveland area - go check it out at this free museum. Marble statuette of a woman ('The Stargazer'), c.3000 BCE, Cleveland Museum of Art

This is even more beautiful in person. If you are in the Cleveland area - go check it out at this free museum. Marble statuette of a woman ('The Stargazer'), c.3000 BCE, Cleveland Museum of Art

Fertility Goddess "As women connected to the earth, we are nurturing and we are fierce, we are wicked and we are sublime. The full range is ours. We hold the moon in our bellies and fire in our hearts. We bleed. We give milk. We are the mothers of first words. These words grow. They are our children. They are our stories and our poems."  An excerpt from "Undressing the Bear" by Terry Tempest Williams

Fertility Goddess "As women connected to the earth, we are nurturing and we are fierce, we are wicked and we are sublime. The full range is ours. We hold the moon in our bellies and fire in our hearts. We bleed. We give milk. We are the mothers of first words. These words grow. They are our children. They are our stories and our poems." An excerpt from "Undressing the Bear" by Terry Tempest Williams

Venus Malta Temple Hagar Qim. Hagar Qim was excavated at the beginning of the nineteenth century and has produced many 'fat figure' statuettes including the naturalistic 'Venus of Malta'. On the outer side of the north flank of Hagar Qim a open-air shrine has been inserted into the wall, whose facade combines the suggestive symbols of the male and female generative organs.

Venus Malta Temple Hagar Qim. Hagar Qim was excavated at the beginning of the nineteenth century and has produced many 'fat figure' statuettes including the naturalistic 'Venus of Malta'. On the outer side of the north flank of Hagar Qim a open-air shrine has been inserted into the wall, whose facade combines the suggestive symbols of the male and female generative organs.

Mohenjo-Daro Mother goddess ~ Western India: Early Harappan 3500-2700 BC (Mohenjo-Daro, Mehrgarh, Jodhpura, Padri)

Mohenjo-Daro Mother goddess ~ Western India: Early Harappan 3500-2700 BC (Mohenjo-Daro, Mehrgarh, Jodhpura, Padri)

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