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Incantation Bowl  6th-8th Century AD  Late-Post Sasanian   Inscribed in spiral from the centre outwards. Mandaic text. An incantation to protect Shrula son of Duktanuba and Qaqay daughter of Kaspasta against evil spirits.

Pottery incantation bowl: hemispherical bowl with simple rim; Inscribed in spiral from the centre outwards. An incantation to protect Shrula son of Duktanuba and Qaqay daughter of Kaspasta against evil spirits.

workman:  spectralbird: Mandaean Incantation Bowl, Iraq, 200-600 CE Written in the Mandaic language, a dialect of Aramaic, the inscription was meant to ward off evil entities from a man named Buktuya, his wife Zaduya, and their family. They would have practiced Mandaeism, a gnostic religion with ties to the Abrahamic faiths, which survives to this day among small communities mostly in diaspora. This particular inscription, since it dates to before the advent of Islam, offers an invaluable…

workman: “ spectralbird: Mandaean Incantation Bowl, Iraq, CE Written in the Mandaic language, a dialect of Aramaic, the inscription was meant to ward off evil entities from a man named.

The Babylonian demon bowl  was used for "trapping" malevolent spirits or demons – which may have been used to conjure them on a desired victim. Iraq, 600 to 800 CE.

Magic Bowls Kelsey Museum 19503 Seleucia-on-Tigris or century A. Clay This bowl is "written" in a pseudo-script, clearly meant to imitate Syriac (an Aramaic dialect and alphabet, used on many demon-bowls).

ZOROASTRIAN INCANTATIONS AGAINST DEMONS, INVOKING AMESHA SPENTA, WITH A QUOTE OF ATASH NIYAYESH, THE FIRE PRAYER: 'WORTHY OF SACRIFICE IN THE HOUSE OF .....'  MS in Zoroastrian Middle Persian on clay, Persia, 5th-7th c., 1 incantation bowl, 28,4x14,5 cm, 15+1+5 lines in Pahlavi script, drawing of 2 very large standing demons with feet chained.

Amesha Spenta or Amahraspand (Holy Immortal) is 6 celestial beings, representing Ahura Mazda's spiritual powers. The major part of this very extensive text, written both inside and outside the present large bowl, has so far not been understood.

Incantation Bowl | Echoes of Egypt | Yale Peabody Museum http://echoesofegypt.peabody.yale.edu/egyptosophy/incantation-bowl

Incantation Bowl | Echoes of Egypt | Yale Peabody Museum http://echoesofegypt.peabody.yale.edu/egyptosophy/incantation-bowl

Aramaic, a Semitic language related to Hebrew and Arabic, was spoken and written all over the Middle East from the beginning of the first millennium BC. Unlike Sumerian or Akkadian, it was written with an alphabet of just 22 letters, making it much easier to learn and use. This bowl from Kish, dating to the 6th century AD, is covered with an incantation in Aramaic to ward off evil demons.

Bowl from Kish (a Mesopotamian city located in what is now Iraq), dating to the century AD, covered with an incantation in Aramaic to ward off evil demons.

apotrapaic Mandean incantation bowl with helical inscription, circular symbols Southern Mesopotamia, c. 200-600 AD "Linear logic might not work & a strong appreciation of the Mandaean imagination is necessary... note the contexts in which (John the Baptist) surfaces, & the sheer bulk of materials on him in Mandaeism" read ar-ab, westwards with the sun's rays, ie R to L from rim to center | Royal Ontario Museum, cited by J. Buckley in AncientJewReview

apotrapaic Mandean incantation bowl with helical inscription, circular symbols Southern Mesopotamia, c. 200-600 AD "Linear logic might not work & a strong appreciation of the Mandaean imagination is necessary... note the contexts in which (John the Baptist) surfaces, & the sheer bulk of materials on him in Mandaeism" read ar-ab, westwards with the sun's rays, ie R to L from rim to center | Royal Ontario Museum, cited by J. Buckley in AncientJewReview