Waka by  Ono no Komachi (825~unknown) うたた寝に 恋しき人を 見てしより 夢てふものは 頼みそめてき "Briefly I slept   and I saw / the person I love now / I put my faith / in this thing called dream "

Japanese poem Haiku by Lady Onono Komachi "Briefly I slept and I saw / the person I love now / I put my faith / in this thing called dream "

Japanese poem Haiku by MATSUO Basho (1644~1694) - 月日は百代の過客にして、行きかふ年もまた旅人なり。『奥の細道』 "Days and months are travellers of eternity. So are the years that pass by." via Kumi Ito

Japanese poem Haiku by MATSUO Basho - "Days and months are travellers of eternity. So are the years that pass by.

Japanese poem by Emperor Fushimi (1265~1317): in the midst of love, within my gaze, / in everything I can't see but one thing / no shade of tree, no blade of grass / only a vision of you 恋しさになりたつ 中のなが目には おもかげならぬ 草も木も無し

Japanese poem by Emperor Fushimi in the midst of love, within my gaze, / in everything I can't see but one thing / no shade of tree, no blade of grass / only a vision of you

Tanka poems by Lady Yosano Akiko 与謝野晶子 (1878-1942), Japan 君こひし寝てもさめても黒髪を梳きても筆の柄をながめても "While sleeping, / waking, / combing my black hair, / looking at my stem of a writing-brush, / I just missing you." (Calligraphy by Mariko Kinoshita)

Tanka poems by Lady Yosano Akiko (Calligraphy by Mariko Kinoshita)

Japanese Waka poem by Lady Ono no Komachi 小野小町 (9th century) うたた寝に 恋しき人を 見てしより 夢てふものは 頼み初めてき "Briefly I slept / and I saw the person I love, / Now I put my faith / in this thing called dream."

Japanese Waka poem by Lady Ono no Komachi century) "Briefly I slept / and I saw the person I love, / Now I put my faith / in this thing called dream.

Japanese poem Haiku by Mizuhara Shūōshi (1892-1981): 冬菊や まとふはおのが ひかりのみ "Winter chrysanthemum, / Wearing nothing / but its own light"

Japanese poem Haiku by Mizuhara Shūōshi "Winter chrysanthemum, / Wearing nothing / but its own light"

Japanese poem by Lady Ono no Komachi (c.825- unknown) "The autumn night / is long only in name / We’ve done no more / than gaze at each other / and it’s already dawn" 小野小町

¤ Poet Ponderings ¤ poetry, quotes & haiku - The autumn night

Poem by Lady Ono-no-komachi (date unknown: around 9th century), Japan "Yielding to a love / That knows no limit, / I shall go to him by night / For the world does not yet censure / Those who tread the paths of dreams."

Shôkadô Shôjô Japanese calligrapher and painter of Immortals the Poetess Lady Ono-no-komachi

Japanese poem Haiku by MATSUO Basho (1644~1694): この道や 行く人無しに 秋の暮 Along this road / Goes no one / This autumn eve

Japanese poem Haiku by MATSUO Basho この道や 行く人無しに 秋の暮 Along this road / Goes no one / This autumn eve Дорого моя!

Japanese poem by Lady Izumi Shikibu from Ogura 100 poems (early 13th century) あらざらむ この世のほかの 思ひ出に 今ひとたびの 逢ふこともがな "Soon my life will close / When I am beyond this world / And have forgotten it, / Let me remember only this: / One final meeting with you. " (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by Lady Izumi Shikibu from Ogura 100 poems (early century) "Soon my life will close / When I am beyond this world / And have forgotten it, / Let me remember only this: / One final meeting with you. " (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem Waka by Yamanoue no Okura (660~733), Japan 銀も金も玉も何せんに まされる宝 子にしかめやも "What are they to me, / Silver, or gold, or jewels? / How could they ever / equal the greater treasure / That is a child?"

Japanese poem Waka by Yamanoue no Okura (660~733), Japan 銀も金も玉も何せんに まされる宝 子にしかめやも "What are they to me, / Silver, or gold, or jewels? / How could they ever / equal the greater treasure / That is a child?"

Japanese poems Haiku by Kiyohara no Fukayabu (early 13th century): In the summer night / The evening still seems present / But the dawn is here / To what region of the clouds / Has the wandering moon come home?

Japanese poems Haiku by Kiyohara no Fukayabu (early century): In the summer night / The evening still seems present / But the dawn is here / To what region of the clouds / Has the wandering moon come home?

Japanese poem by the Lady Suo from Ogura 100 poems (early 13th century) "If I lay my head / Upon his arm in the dark / Of a short spring night, / This innocent dream pillow / Will be the death of my good name" 春の夜の 夢ばかりなる 手枕に かひなく立たむ 名こそ惜しけれ (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by the Lady Suo from Ogura 100 poems (early century) "If I lay my head / Upon his arm in the dark / Of a short spring night, / This innocent dream pillow / Will be the death of my good name" (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by Fujiwara no Kanesuke from Ogura 100 poems (early 13th century) みかの原 わきてながるる 泉川 いつ見きとてか 恋しかるらむ "Over Mika's plain, / Gushing forth and flowing free / Is Izumi's stream / I do not know if we have met / Why, then, do I long for her?" (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by Fujiwara no Kanesuke from Ogura 100 poems (early 13th century) みかの原 わきてながるる 泉川 いつ見きとてか 恋しかるらむ "Over Mika's plain, / Gushing forth and flowing free / Is Izumi's stream / I do not know if we have met / Why, then, do I long for her?" (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by Fujiwara no Sadayori from Ogura 100 poems (early 13th century) "In the early dawn / When the mists on Uji River / Slowly lift and clear, / From the shallows to the deep, / The stakes of fishing nets appear." 朝ぼらけ 宇治の川ぎり たえだえに あらはれわたる ぜぜの網代木 (calligraphy by yopiko)

Japanese poem by Fujiwara no Sadayori from Ogura 100 poems (early century)…

Kanji calligraphy of Matsuo Basho’s haiku: Sake nomeba / Itodo nerarenu / Yoru no yuki (The more I drink / the more I can’t sleep / night snow). Source

beifongkendo: “Kanji calligraphy of Matsuo Basho’s haiku: Sake nomeba / Itodo nerarenu / Yoru no yuki (The more I drink / the more I can’t sleep / night snow).

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