Kitsune 狐 significa zorro, animal que constituye un elemento de singular importancia en el folclore japonés, de hecho se utiliza para nombrar a un espíritu cuya función clásica es la de proteger bosques y aldeas.

Kitsune 狐 sMany of these more modern Japanese masks have charming features and brilliant characterisation but wouldn't stand-up on stage.

I like this because there are multiple masks and each are very different my favorite is the middle one in the bottom.

Masks and costumes from traditional Japanese Noh theater - Japanese masks 3 by…

Japanese masks....I heard that they would carve/shade them a specific way. So when the person moves their head at an angle (takes motion), the mask would seem to change emotions.

I heard that they would carve/shade them a specific way. So when the person moves their head at an angle (takes motion), the mask would seem to change emotions.

Japanese mask vendor at Matsuri festival - always wanted to attend a festival like this! Check out Pokemon masks!

Japanese mask vendor at Matsuri festival, Matsue-shi, Shimane Prefecture, Japan, photograph by Greg Ferguson.

Fox Wedding 狐の嫁入り Actually the term Kitsune no Yomeiri [狐の嫁入り] refers to the occurrence of rain occurring during brilliant sunshine, which is said to occur a fox bride is going through the woods to the house of her fox groom. Sometimes during festival occasions, shrines would stage the “fox wedding” as well, and that is when we would get to see the interesting couple wearing the fox mask.

Fox Wedding 狐の嫁入り Actually the term Kitsune no Yomeiri [狐の嫁入り] refers to the occurrence of rain occurring during brilliant sunshine, which is said to occur a fox bride is going through the woods to the house of her fox groom.

Scroll down for a guide to Tokyo shopping, with thanks to Lonely Planet  | ce petit cochon | travel | tokyo japan

Japanese drinks for beginners

Asakusa. by BeboFlickr, via Flickr

Plastic toy children's masks representing characters from television and film, Tokyo, Japan, photograph by Alberto Cassani.

なまはげ

Namahage (生剥) in traditional Japanese folklore is a demonlike being, portrayed by men wearing oversized ogre masks and traditional straw capes (mino) during a New Year's ritual of the Oga Peninsula area of Akita Prefecture in northern Honshū, Japan.

Masks for sale in Asakusa

Top 10 places to shop in Tokyo

二十五菩薩練り供養 | A parade - held only once in three years - commemorating Honen, the founder of the Jodo sect of pure land Buddhism at Chion-ji temple in Kyoto. 25 participants wear golden masks which are usually stored in a temple in the prefecture of Okayama (western Japan) and carry different Japanese court music instruments.

二十五菩薩練り供養 | A parade - held only once in three years - commemorating Honen, the founder of the Jodo sect of pure land Buddhism at Chion-ji temple in Kyoto. 25 participants wear golden masks which are usually stored in a temple in the prefecture of Okayama (western Japan) and carry different Japanese court music instruments.

Bugaku

Essays on self reference phenomenon The self-reference effect describes the phenomenon that information pertaining to self is better remembered and recalled.

Pinterest
Search