Kobe, 1906. Merchants display their wares in a New Year cart procession, one of the few New Year customs in this series that can not be seen anymore. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906.

Merchants display their wares in a New Year cart procession, one of the few New Year customs in this series that can not be seen anymore. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in

Kobe, 1906. New Year Celebrations. A booth selling ropes made of rice straw used to decorate the entrance way. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906.

Kobe, New Year Celebrations. A booth selling ropes made of rice straw used to decorate the entrance way. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in

Tokyo in the 1890's. This photograph displays Tokyo’s most popular transportation modes during the Meiji Period (1868-1912), horse drawn streetcars and jinrikisha (rickshaws). A small family is stepping out of the streetcar, most probably on their way to visit the new Ueno Park, a favorite attraction during this period.

This photograph displays Tokyo's most popular transportation modes during the Meiji Period horse drawn streetcars and jinrikisha (rickshaws).

Kobe, 1906.  New Year Celebrations.  Bamboo decorations herald the coming of the New Year. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906.

Kobe, New Year Celebrations. Bamboo decorations herald the coming of the New Year. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in

The Kobe Bund in 1930 (Showa 5) lined with the offices of steamship companies and trading houses. The tall building in the back with the rounded ornament on the corner is the office of Osaka Shosen Kaisha, a major Osaka-based steamship line. It is one of the only buildings on this photo that still stands today.

The Kobe Bund in 1930 (Showa lined with the offices of steamship companies…

An image of Nagoya Castle. You can see the donjon at the inner citadel and a small tower. The buildings in the foreground form part of the honmaru palace. The structures on the ends of the roof are golden shachihoko,  a mythical animal with a dolphin body and a lion head that protects the building from fire. This image is extremely valuable because it shows what Nagoya Castle looked like during the Meiji Period  before many buildings were destroyed by the  Earthquake of 1891 or torn down.

An image of Nagoya Castle. You can see the donjon at the inner citadel and a…

Kobe, 1906.  A housewife shops for a plant during the preparations for New Year. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906.

Kobe, A housewife shops for a plant during the preparations for New Year. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in

Kobe, 1906.  A booth selling items for the New Year celebrations. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906. Click on Read Full Article to read the original text that accompanied this image.

The first photos ever used for Japanese tourism show Japan as it was 100 years ago

Kotohira-gu, popularly known as Konpira-san, a Shinto shrine in Kotohira, Kagawa Prefecture. Amazingly, the main shrine building seen on this image—built in 1877 (Meiji 10)—looks virtually exactly the same today. This is one of those relatively few places left in Japan where you can truly jump back into time.

Shikoku, very rare photo of Kotohira-gu, a Shinto shrine popularly known as Konpira-san, in Kotohira, Kagawa Prefecture on the island of Shikoku.

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