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Yukio Mishima

Yukio Mishima

Handsome Mishima and lovely cat

Handsome Mishima and lovely cat

11.25: The Day He Chose His Own Fate On November 25th 1970, a man committed ritual suicide inside the Tokyo headquarters of the Japanese Ministry of Defence, leaving behind a legacy of masterpieces and a controversy that echoes to this day. The man was Yukio Mishima, one of Japan's greatest and most celebrated novelists. With four members of his own private army - the Tatenokai - Mishima had taken the commandant hostage and called upon the assembled military outside the Ministry to overthrow

11·25 jiketsu no hi: Mishima Yukio to wakamono-tachi (2012)

11.25: The Day He Chose His Own Fate On November 25th 1970, a man committed ritual suicide inside the Tokyo headquarters of the Japanese Ministry of Defence, leaving behind a legacy of masterpieces and a controversy that echoes to this day. The man was Yukio Mishima, one of Japan's greatest and most celebrated novelists. With four members of his own private army - the Tatenokai - Mishima had taken the commandant hostage and called upon the assembled military outside the Ministry to overthrow

Yukio Mishima at school ~

Yukio Mishima at school ~

“What transforms this world is — knowledge. Do you see what I mean? Nothing else can change anything in this world. Knowledge alone is capable of transforming the world, while at the same time leaving it exactly as it is. When you look at the world with knowledge, you realize that things are unchangeable and at the same time are constantly being transformed.”  —     Yukio Mishima, The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

“What transforms this world is — knowledge. Do you see what I mean? Nothing else can change anything in this world. Knowledge alone is capable of transforming the world, while at the same time leaving it exactly as it is. When you look at the world with knowledge, you realize that things are unchangeable and at the same time are constantly being transformed.” — Yukio Mishima, The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

Yukio Mishima par Marguerite Yourcenar

Yukio Mishima par Marguerite Yourcenar

Yukio Mishima

Yukio Mishima

Yukio Mishima speaks during a debate at the University of Tokyo in May 1969.

Yukio Mishima speaks during a debate at the University of Tokyo in May 1969.

Seppuku (or as it’s commonly known “harakiri”) is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. As part of the samurai bushido honor code, seppuku was used voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture), as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed for other reasons that had brought shame to them.

Seppuku (or as it’s commonly known “harakiri”) is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. As part of the samurai bushido honor code, seppuku was used voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture), as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed for other reasons that had brought shame to them.

“Possessing by letting go of things was a secret of ownership unknown to youth.”  - Yukio MISHIMA (1925~1970), Japanese author 三島由紀夫

“Possessing by letting go of things was a secret of ownership unknown to youth.” - Yukio MISHIMA (1925~1970), Japanese author 三島由紀夫

mishima yukio - Cerca con Google

mishima yukio - Cerca con Google

『憂国』ポスターと三島由紀夫氏  『グラフィカ 三島由紀夫』(新潮社)

『憂国』ポスターと三島由紀夫氏 『グラフィカ 三島由紀夫』(新潮社)

直球感想文 本館の画像|エキサイトブログ (blog)

直球感想文 本館の画像|エキサイトブログ (blog)

Mishima Yukio 三島 由紀夫 (1925-1970) at home - Tokyo - 1961 Photo : Burt Glinn for Holiday Magazine

Mishima Yukio 三島 由紀夫 (1925-1970) at home - Tokyo - 1961 Photo : Burt Glinn for Holiday Magazine