Writing Styles

Collection by Allie Howard • Last updated 6 days ago

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Word Choice
Writing Prompt
Music Inspiration
Psychology of Characters
Fight Scenes
References
Creating Emotion in Writing
Other Worlds
Character
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Word Choice

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Writing Prompt

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Music Inspiration

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Psychology of Characters

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Fight Scenes

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References

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Creating Emotion in Writing

Other Worlds

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Character

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10 Warning Signs of Amateurish Writing & How to Fix Them

As writers, the last thing we want to do is appear amateurish.

7 Ways To Create A Spectacular Magic System For Your Novel

Writers Write is your one-stop writing resource. Use this list we put together to create a spectacular magic system in your novel.

Writing your first novel? Don't fall for these mistakes!

Writing your first novel? 20+ Mistakes to Avoid, as Told by the Industry's Best Experts!

Home The Feminist Project - The Feminist Project

Meme memes lT3yZuia6 — iFunny

Sorry for being dead my dudes - Sorry for being dead my dudes – popular memes on the site ifunny.co

Avoiding Stilted Dialogue-author toolbox - The Manuscript Shredder

Bad dialogue will ruin an otherwise great story. Don’t fall into these common traps.

Writing With Your Authentic Voice - A Little Light

Our month of authenticity is merging into our month of writing. The two overlap - How do we write with our authentic voice? Free workbook for writers

9 Epic, Underused Mythical Animals for Your Fantasy Novel

So you're writing a fantasy novel? You're going to need a starter bag: Do you have your hero? Check. Your sidekick? Check. Your villain? Check. Your magic system? Check. Your different races (elves, dwarves, humans, etc)? Check. That big forest all fantasy characters invariably have to travel through? Check. It would seem that your starter bag is full. Now go forth and conquer your story world! *stands back and watches you leave* Wait, wait! Come back! We forgot about your mythical animals…

The Story Structure Series Pt 6: The Third Plot Point | The Novel Smithy

The Third Plot Point is one of the most important plot points in the Three Act Structure. Get ready, because your hero will face their darkest moment yet.

Five Mistakes New Writers Make (Paperback Kingdom)

Today we have a guest post by Trisha Tobias, who has worked on books such as the award-winning Alice: The Wanderland Chronicles by J.M. Sullivan, and Chasing Eveline by Leslie Hauser: When it comes to writing, there aren’t many hard rules. It’s a...READ MORE

Dropping Clues and Hiding Secrets Like J. K. Rowling, Part 2: Divert Attention with Jokes and Ridiculous Statements — The Writing Kylie

One of the biggest reasons J. K. Rowling turned the fans of her Harry Potter series into fanatics were—besides from the exceptional characters and rich world building—the clues and hidden secrets that were sprinkled through each book. These things had the fanatic fans searching the stor

The Ultimate Guide to Planning for NaNoWriMo

Can you really write 50,000 words in 30 days? Sure! Here are 10 steps to take to help you get ready for #NaNoWriMo this year... Free checklist included!

World Building: 4 Questions to ask When Thinking Through Technology

I have been slowly working through a rather long series of blog posts about world building for speculative fiction (e.g. fantasy, science fiction.) Any time an author builds a new world, a certain …

10 Writing Mistakes that Kill Your First Chapter

By Marcy Kennedy (@MarcyKennedy) I’m teaching at a writer’s conference this week, so instead of one of my in-depth posts, I thought I’d create a quick checklist for you. Here are 10 writing mistakes that kill your first chapter (in no particular order). Get them before they get you! #1 – A Boring/Generic First Line(...)

Writing in Deep POV

Deep POV brings your reader and your character closer together. Learn one surefire technique to go deep and bridge the gap.

5 Must-Dos for Creating Believable Characters

She came to you in a dream, at the dinner table, in the shower. What did she tell you? Did she speak at all? Did her looks explain everything? The majority of writers understand they cannot completely control their characters. Why? When you create them they become their own person. The writer is just there to report the journey through the conflicts they made. (If you need help with conflicts, start here: Conflict and Character.) I've read from several reference books on how I go about…